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909 South Schumaker Drive
Salisbury, MD 21804
410.742.4988

Museum Hours

Mon - Sat: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sun: 12 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Consigning Artists

At Treetops Gifts of Art and Nature, we highly value hand made, one of a kind, locally sourced pieces. Because of this value, we have a rotating list of local consignors who sell their wares in our shop. We try to carry a wide variety so everyone can find something they love.

Current Consignors
 

Amused Studios
Salisbury, MD
Pottery

Sarah and Robert started Amused Studios as a home based pottery in 2006.  They like the name Amused Studios because it was open to other kinds of art which they are both interested in. The two also have a small lampworking studio where they make pendants, beads, marbles and rings.  Sarah enjoys it because it is more immediate than pottery and she can work on it while the baby naps, then have finished pieces the next day.  It's quite relaxing and mesmerizing.  The two are on the board for The Art Institute and Gallery and put on a yearly show for the Clay Guild of The Eastern Shore. They are also working with 1st Saturday a free monthly music series which they co-ordinate the Arts Market for. Art their passion and livelihood.

William Scott Belote
MD
Decoy Carvings

William S. Belote is a retired barge captain who now carves full-time. His body of work  includes: wildfowl carvings, contemporary antiques, miniature and contemporary decoys, as well as shorebirds and gunners. From a young age, Belote was immersed in carving culture. Starting at age 10, he began to teach himself to carve. Belote has gone on to win Best in Division 5 times at the  Annual Ward World Carving Competition in Ocean City, MD and  Best of Show 3 times at the Wildfowl Expo Chesapeake Challenge Competition. He is also a certified NEA instructor. He enjoys his work for being both challenging and relaxing.  Belote’s greatest sources of pride include others enjoying his work and his students’ joy when they win. Belote works from a studio in his attic, with one side dedicated to carving and the opposite side for painting. He tries to work on something every day, and says that “quality, not quantity” is the quote he creates by. Belote says the  hardest part of his work is figuring how what to make next.
 

Bling Doctor
Princess Anne, MD
Jewelry

Bling Doctor Jewelry is custom, handmade, fashion jewelry by Dr. Charlene Herzins.  Charlene is a retired educator who taught choral music, was a guidance counselor, and ended her tenure in public education helping other teachers to teach more effectively.  She has taught at the university master level students who are preparing to be psychotherapists and counselors.  A published author, she continues to lecture and give seminars on topics relevant to educators. Since childhood, when her aunt would give her broken pieces of jewelry to play with, she has had a passion for jewelry.  As a little girl many a summer day was passed doing fashion shows of high fashion using ‘sheer curtains’ and ‘broken jewelry’ on a picnic table runway with friends.  During her last years in education she used her talent for making jewelry/accessories to create incentives for teachers and students, and upon retiring, decided to open a jewelry and accessories business. Partnering with her husband, they opened their business in November 2009.  Bling Doctor designs  have been worn at the White House and have traveled back home with customers to Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Czechoslovakia, North Korea, Great Britain, Spain, Canada and literally all over the United States.
 

Richard Coolidge
Princess Anne, MD
Wooden Cutting Boards and Trivets

Richard Coolidge is retired after spending 36 years at G.E., 25 of them as a machinist. In his spare time he creates hand crafted cutting boards and trivets. It is a hobby he loves, and it is self-taught. He enjoys working with wood, and loves the thrill of shaping lumber into a beautiful product. He also loves when his pieces go to new homes and are loved by others. His workshop is a one car garage with his tools on wheels. He works mostly during the day in the Spring, Summer, and Fall. He says that the hardest part of the work is keeping motivated to finish pieces, and that he works best when he has a deadline.
 

Teena Gorrow
Cambridge, MD
Books

Teena Gorrow is a Professor of Education at Salisbury University, and in her spare time she photographs ospreys and bald eagles for wildlife photography books. She works early in the morning and late at night in a small home office, and the books that she has collaborated on are her favorite pieces. She also creates hand crafted note cards and prints of her photography.
 

Charley Harper
Chicago, IL
Minimalist Artwork

Charles “Charley” Harper (1922-2007) was a graphic artist and commercial illustrator who is best known today for his work as a wildlife artist.  Harper’s highly stylized wildlife prints, posters, and book illustrations have captivated generations of viewers. Harper is considered an American Modernist, and referred to his own style as “minimal realism,” since he relied in large part on clean lines and flat planes of color to depict his subjects. He used simple but powerful shapes, overlapping lines to create movement, and bold colors to distinguish a subject’s features. The results are captivating and sometimes humorous images of the natural world. Although Harper passed away in 2007, his unique and colorful illustrations continue to captivate viewers.
 

Porter Hopkins
Cambridge, MD
Wood Carving

Porter Hopkins was born in Baltimore, MD in 1930, and grew up in Maryland and Maine. As a youth he was encouraged to draw by his parents, and he began keeping journals and sketch pads with detailed notes and drawings, often while hunting and fishing. Later he studied pre- architecture at Princeton University, and developed an interest military and engineering sketches while working at the Maryland Historical Society. An avid hunter himself, Hopkins became fascinated with duck hunting on the Chesapeake in the 1960s, and had the opportunity to meet, and was inspired by, Lem and Steve Ward. Hopkins first tried his own hand at carving duck and pigeon decoys by the late ‘60s, and began carving decorative miniatures after that. In 1978 Hopkins moved to a farm on Maryland’s Eastern Shore, where he lives with his wife Patti, also an artist. The Hopkins’s farm is home to Porter’s barn and studio. Works in progress are surrounded by shelves filled with dusty decoys, carvings, feathers, old tools, curios, and remnants of a long and interesting life.
 

Ellen Lawler
Salisbury, MD
Watercolor Painting

Ellen Lawler grew up in Philadelphia, PA, in a family that often took outings such as drives in the country or trips to museums together. Being exposed to the natural world in such a way, she developed an interest in art and wildlife early on. Despite being a college biology professor by trade, she has been painting and drawing seriously and consistently for the last 20 years. Her favorite part about her art is going into the field to draw birds, as it forces her to really study them closely; even as they fly by her, she observes them and tries to capture their personality. Ellen is inspired by wildlife artists Adele Earnshaw and Joe Garcia, who she has taken workshops with, as well as world-renowned artists like Johannes Vermeer. She hopes through her work, she conveys the beauty and the wonder in the remarkable creatures that are around us every day, and ultimately, increase someone’s awareness of the need to preserve our natural heritage.
 

Vicky Mullany
MD
Hunting Lodge Cookbook

Vicky Mullany grew up in the countryside of Virginia where eating farm fresh foods, home cooked family meals, and wild game were a way of life. Havnig five children and three grandchildren, she has always believed that family meals should be an integral part of raising strong children. Upon moving with her family to Black Pearl Farms on the Eastern Shore of Maryland and taking on the responsibilities of managing a lodge, she decided her love of the culinary arts would enhance the guest experience. Authors, artists, congressmen, generals, ambassadors, judges, industry leaders, and exceptional people from many walks of life rave about her cooking. During the season her kitchen is alive with activity, enhanced by laughter and stories told by her guests from all over the world.
 

Doug Rayfield
Allen, MD
Traditional Artwork

A native of the Eastern Shore, born in Crisfield and raised in Somerset County, Doug drew and sketched for entertainment while growing up. He began drawing his favorite comic strip characters at the age of six and progressed, becoming the art editor of his senior high school yearbook. Having spent a great deal of his early years roaming the marshes, woodlands, and waterways of lower Delmarva, he decided to begin painting those scenes in the early seventies. As a self taught artist, Doug has dedicated much time to reading and studying art history as well as the techniques and styles of the old masters along with his favorite contemporary artists. He was one of the founding members of the Somerset County Art Association (which later become part of the Somerset County Arts Council) and served two terms as its president. In 1976, he had a rendering of one of Somerset County's pre-revolution manor houses published in 18th Century Structures of the Lower Eastern Shore". While still considered an amateur, he highly values the time he spends on his favorite hobby.
 

Erick Sahler
Salisbury, MD
Serigraph Prints

Erick is an American Screen Printing Association certified graphic artist and screen printer who has designed thousands of illustrations, graphics, cartoons and logos on the Eastern Shore of Maryland since 1983. Erick Sahler Serigraphs was launched in 2011. In addition to art, he enjoys long road trips, rooting for the home team, dirt track racing, tinkering with his ’73 Camaro and hanging out with the family’s Chesapeake Bay retriever, Chance. All of his artwork is hand printed. For each color, he creates a stencil in a high-mesh screen through which ink is “pulled” with a squeegee. Colors are hand printed one sheet of paper at a time, usually working from the lightest to darkest colors, at a rate of two colors per day. It takes a week or more to complete the printing on most of his editions. While the process is more labor intensive than printing a digital image or giclee, serigraphs are more bold and vibrant than other types of art prints. In addition, small variances in the screen-printing process make each serigraph a unique work of art.
 

Rich Smoker
Marion, MD
Decoy Carving

Rich Smoker began his carving career in the late 1960's when he made decoys with his late father for use on the Susquehanna River in Pennsylvania. He now lives in Marion Station, Maryland on the banks of the Big Annemessex River and continues to make decoys as well as other avian sculptures. He became specialized in avian taxidermy after apprenticing in the subject for nine years. Now, strictly as a wood carver, he has won over 500 ribbons and over 100 Best of Shows. He has judged at many carving show on the East coast, as well as the Federal Duck Stamp contest in Washington, DC and the Junior Federal Duck Stamp contest. Smoker was invited to represent Maryland at the Smithsonian Museum Decoy Contest and was inducted into the Waterfowl Festival Hall of Fame in 2001. He is on the board of the Ward Foundation and is a member of the World Competition Committee. In 2008, he won the World Championship in Shootin' Rig. In 2011, he was awarded Achievement in Living Traditions and Arts (ALTA) by Maryland Traditions, the folklife program of the Maryland State Arts Council. Smoker teaches his art to other carvers from around the country and is very proud to have a brother and daughter involved in the art form. Smoker was also named a Living Legend in 2016!
 

John Clark
Havre de Grace, MD
Decoy Carving

John H. Clark was born on December 21, 1949 and has worked as a shop foreman for the Maryland National Guard. From the time that he was six years old Clark grew up hunting. However, it was not until 1981, after being inspired by Pat Vincenti, that he began making decoys. In an effort to make sure his birds look different from anyone else’s, Clark prefers to make gunning style birds (gunning style means there is a weight, ring, and staple on the bottom of the decoy) with ornamental heads on them. Clark often has help completing his decoys as his wife contributes by sanding, puttying, and priming the birds. Clark has stated that “decoy making is a funny business, but it is the best business to be in. People that you thought would never help you out with a problem will be more than willing to help if you ask. Carvers are a special breed of people.” Not surprisingly, John’s son, John Jr., has also taken up carving in the footsteps of his father and mother.
 

Paul Rhymer
Maryland
Bronze Sculpture

Paul comes from a family of artists and has drawn and painted his whole life.  After receiving an Associate of Arts degree from a local college in 1984, he accepted a job at the Smithsonian Institution doing taxidermy and model making and retired in 2010.  As a result of so much three-dimensional work in his museum job, his own personal artwork gradually began to transform from painting and drawing into sculpture.  Being an avid birder, waterfowl hunter, and taxidermist gives him constant anatomy and behavioral learning experiences that inspire his sculpture. Paul’s work has been exhibited in such prestigious art shows such as the National Sculpture Society, the Society of Animal Artists and Birds in Art. His wildlife sculpture is at the National Zoo, National Museum of Natural History, the Denver Zoo, Woodson Art Museum, Hiraim Blauvelt Museum and various public buildings and parks and private collections thought the US. He is on the Boards of Directors for the Society of Animal Artists and the Ward Museum of Wildfowl Art.
 

Purple Lily Studios
Annapolis, MD
Watercolor Painting

Ever since I was a little girl, I have been making pretty things with my hands. I used to make birthday cards for family members. My parents still have their wedding anniversary present I made them so many years ago - it was fashioned from an empty egg carton. A lot has changed since childhood, but I still love making things. I have been making jewelry since 1998 and I am continually fascinated by the mathematics of chainmail. I also am a paper crafter and mixed media artist. I love playing with different mediums and experiencing the thrill of a great finished project. My newest love is soap making. It began when I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia. In an effort to pursue a more natural, healthier lifestyle, I began making my own soap. People loved it and I began selling.  I love thinking of soaps as blank art canvases and love to give my soaps pretty swirls in different colors. I hope you enjoy using my products as much as I love creating them.
 

Riley Mica Designs
Maryland
Hand Painted Pendants

Leela Rae Hein lives in Maryland with her Husband and seven year old, Riley Mica. They are her best friends.  She loves to read, draw, paint, sculpt, and generally create, listen to music and play outdoors. She has a strange obsession with all things cephalopod, Steam punk, hidden passages or rooms, anything sparkly or glittering, old keys, door knobs, old doors, dragon flies, lightning bugs, and basically anything strange or different. She briefly attended art school at the Corcoran College of Art and is mostly self taught through trial and error, as well as life itself. Leela works in pencil, pen and ink, clay, polymer clay, beads, watercolors, acrylics, and anything she can get her hands on.
 

Susan Taylor
Hurlock, MD
Basketry

Originally from New Jersey, Susan Taylor moved to the Eastern Shore 56 years ago after attending college in Dover, Delaware. She started making baskets in 1983, when she signed up for a class. A basket that was supposed to take several weeks took her only days; she couldn’t put it down! From then on she devoured all things baskets, and states that she can’t imagine not making baskets. Susan’s passion for basketry now comes through—not only in her hand-crafted baskets—but in her teaching as well. She has been an invited instructor all across Delmarva, and we are excited to showcase her talents here at the Ward Museum.
 

Terralee Designs
Quantico, MD
Jewelry

Terri Lokey of Terralee Designs formerly worked as a floral designer at Kitty's Flowers for almost eleven years. She always had an appreciation for beautiful things to catch the eye, and still does floral arrangements when not working up pieces of jewelry. She says that she has always loved and enjoyed art, so putting a hand in to create it herself was not a very far leap for her to make. The most rewarding thing for her is creating beauty with each piece. Her workshop is very messy and she works all hours of the day. Terri says that the hardest part of her work is focusing on one piece at a time. See pieces from Terralee Designs and other artists at Treetops Gifts.
 

Tyvee B Creations
Salisbury, MD
Handmade Jewelry

Six years ago, Tyvette Brown “happened upon” jewelry making as she was visiting her then pregnant sister in-law out of town.  They went to an Amish Market to shop for a rocker to put in the nursery and while waiting, Tyvette spotted a beautiful handmade bracelet at the register.  She purchased it and took it home.  It wasn’t long before she became curious as to how she could make a bracelet such as the one she purchased.  She went to the local craft store, bought the needed materials and went to creating!  Other’s noticed her creations and began to inquire about them.  What began as a hobby, became a business venture that Tyvette currently owns and operates. Tyvee B Creations specializes in handmade jewelry and accessories.  They specialize in beading and wire working with natural, precious, and semi-precious stones as well as different types of metals, including precious metals.  Tyvee B Creations also offers jewelry classes for anyone, whether they’re interested in furthering their knowledge in jewelry making or just wanting to have fun by trying something different.  Tyvette Brown currently lives in Salisbury with her husband of 11 years and two handsome boys, 9 and 3 years old.  Being a wife and mother are her greatest joy!
 

Fred Vanderveen
Salisbury, MD
Recycled Woodworker

Fred Vanderveen is a retired educator with a love for woodworking. He started the Wood is Wonderful shop on 2015, making items such as furniture, boxes, and bowls. His grandfather taught him woodworking, and his father’s tinsmithing instilled in him a love for hand made goods. Fred loves crafting and bringing new life to the wood pieces he finds, and his greatest reward is the smiling faces of those who bring his products into their homes. He creates his pieces in a workshop, which is full of wood chips and shavings. Instead of discarding the chips and shavings, he uses them for his wood stove. Tuesday and Thursdays are his shop days, and during the winter he spends time in there on the weekends. Summer weekends are for camping. The hardest part of his work is leaving the shop once he gets started - it’s very easy for him to lose track of time.
 

Vesna Zidovec
Exmore, VA
Ceramic Plates

Vesna Zidovec spends her days immersed in clay, wedging, shaping, carving and decorating.  Zidovec runs her own business with her daughter, Mara Davis, creating unique clay products such as tiles, mirrors, clocks and dishes.  This mother-daughter duo’s combined artistry is a formula for success. Though Zidovec has not always worked with clay, she has always been interested in arts.  She was born in Rome, grew up in Argentina and traveled as a painter throughout Latin America, Europe and the United States.  Zidovec received recognition and prizes in fine arts throughout her travels.  She moved to the Eastern Shore over 25 years ago, and for the past 15 years has been focusing her artistic talents on clay.  Her son was the source of her inspiration.  When he was 2, he was fascinated with clay, and often Zidovec would sit and play with him.  “He eventually stopped, but I haven’t,” Zidovec says. “Clay work is just a wonderful thing to do,” Zidovec says.  “In this world things are so difficult and sometimes you cannot influence anything.  Everything is so out of hand.  So many things you cannot change or do anything about, but you can do something with a little piece of clay.” Zidovec is currently a member of the Artisans Guild of the Eastern Shore of VA.